Just a Second: Façade

Leon Battista Albert, Façade of Santa Maria Novella, Florence, 1448-1470, Photo by Georges Jansoone via Wikimedia Commons, GNU Free Documentation License. Leon Battista Albert, Façade of Santa Maria Novella, Florence, 1448-1470, Photo by Georges Jansoone via Wikimedia Commons, GNU Free Documentation License.

Façade (noun) From the French word for “face,” a façade is the front of a building that faces the street where people enter. Leon Battista Alberti’s early Renaissance design for the façade of Santa Maria Novella used many colors of … Continue reading

Make the Time: Yale University Art Gallery

Portrait of the Roman Emperor Caligula, 37-41 CE, marble, 13” x 8¼” x 9¼”,  Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Photo by Jacqueline Poggi via Flickr, Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic License. Portrait of the Roman Emperor Caligula, 37-41 CE, marble, 13” x 8¼” x 9¼”, Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Photo by Jacqueline Poggi via Flickr, Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic License.

After nearly ten years years, Yale University has opened the doors to a $135 million renovation and expansion of their art museum that combines three older art galleries into one, creating one space of over 64,000 square feet in which … Continue reading

You Just Have to See It for Yourself

Donald Judd, 100 untitled works in mill aluminum, 1982-1986, aluminum, 41 x 51 x 72 inches each, Chinati Foundation, Marfa, TX, Photo by OneEighteen via Flickr, Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.0 Generic License. Donald Judd, 100 untitled works in mill aluminum, 1982-1986, aluminum, 41 x 51 x 72 inches each, Chinati Foundation, Marfa, TX, Photo by OneEighteen via Flickr, Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.0 Generic License.

Paul Emsley, the artist who painted the portrait of Kate Middleton that was recently unveiled to the public and is now hanging in the National Portrait Gallery in London, felt a need make the statement that the painting doesn’t photograph … Continue reading

Just a Second: Tracery

Detail of the stone vault in the staircase to the Refectory of Christ Church College, Oxford, 1847, Photo by Fr Lawrence Lew, O.P. via Flickr, Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic License. Detail of the stone vault in the staircase to the Refectory of Christ Church College, Oxford, 1847, Photo by Fr Lawrence Lew, O.P. via Flickr, Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic License.

Tracery (noun) Ornamental interlacing and branching lines in architecture. Sometimes tracery is openwork decorating a window as in Gothic cathedrals and other times it spreads across flat surfaces like ceiling vaults.  Tracery can be carved in wood or made from … Continue reading

Jacob Lawrence Used the Appropriate Language

Jacob Lawrence, Confrontation at the Bridge from the series entitled, Not Songs of Loyalty Alone: The Struggle for Personal Freedom, 1975, Silkscreen, 19.5” x 25.85”, Photo by Zeal Harris via Flickr, Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic License. Jacob Lawrence, Confrontation at the Bridge from the series entitled, Not Songs of Loyalty Alone: The Struggle for Personal Freedom, 1975, Silkscreen, 19.5” x 25.85”, Photo by Zeal Harris via Flickr, Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic License.

“When the subject is strong, simplicity is the only way to treat it.”  - Jacob Lawrence Jacob Lawrence was an American painter best known for his portrayal of essential moments in African American history.  Influenced by Cubism, Lawrence used bright colors … Continue reading

Travel Posters, Japanese Style

Andō Hiroshige, Snow at Kambara from the Fifty-Three Stations of the Tōkaidō Highway series, c. 1833, woodblock print, 9.9” x 14.8”, Brooklyn Museum, New York, Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons. Andō Hiroshige, Snow at Kambara from the Fifty-Three Stations of the Tōkaidō Highway series, c. 1833, woodblock print, 9.9” x 14.8”, Brooklyn Museum, New York, Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons.

Inspired by Hokusai’s success with his views of Mount Fuji, Japanese artist Andō Hiroshige created prints of the various locales in Japan capturing the mood and character of each setting.  In his Snow at Kambara from his Fifty-Three Stations of … Continue reading

Just a Second: Combination Print

Oscar Gustave Rejlander, Two Ways of Life, 1857, albumen print, 31" x 16", Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons. Oscar Gustave Rejlander, Two Ways of Life, 1857, albumen print, 31

Combination Print (noun) A printing technique in photography, popular in the nineteenth century, in which a photographer would compose a final image using more than one negative.  To make the combination print, the photographer would expose only a section of … Continue reading

In Their Own Words: Umberto Boccioni

Umberto Boccioni, Unique Forms of Continuity in Space, 1913, bronze, 48" x 15 1/2" x 36", Museum of Modern Art, New York, Photo by William Cromar, Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic License. Umberto Boccioni, Unique Forms of Continuity in Space, 1913, bronze, 48

“A portrait, to be a work of art, neither must nor may resemble the sitter… one must paint its atmosphere.” Umberto Boccioni Happy New Year from The Art Minute.  

Barocci’s Silent Night

Federico Barocci, The Nativity, 1597, oil on canvas, 52.75" x 41.33", Museo del Prado, Madrid, Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons. Federico Barocci, The Nativity, 1597, oil on canvas, 52.75

Working near the end of the Mannerist era, Federico Barocci was given to unusual compositions and colors, as is seen in his Nativity with the steep, diagonal recession into space where Joseph opens the door to let the shepherds into … Continue reading