Make the Time: Contemporary Chinese Art at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Duan Jianyu, Detail of Beautiful Dream 4, 2008, Ink on cardboard, 23 1/2 × 20 in., Sigg Collection, Hong Kong, Photo by pburka via Flickr, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 License. Duan Jianyu, Detail of Beautiful Dream 4, 2008, Ink on cardboard, 23 1/2 × 20 in., Sigg Collection, Hong Kong, Photo by pburka via Flickr, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 License.

Currently on view through April 6th at the Metropolitan Museum of Art is the fascinating exhibition, “Ink Art: Past as Present in Contemporary China.”  All of the works of art exhibited continue the Chinese artistic tradition of using pen and … Continue reading

In Their Own Words: Mahatma Gandhi

Banksy, Peace and Love, 2010, Chinatown, San Francisco, Photo by Ryan Sharp via Flickr, Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic License. Banksy, Peace and Love, 2010, Chinatown, San Francisco, Photo by Ryan Sharp via Flickr, Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic License.

“The day the power of love overrules the love of power, the world will know peace.” Mahatma Gandhi Happy Valentine’s Day from The Art Minute.  

Just a Second: Champlevé

Reliquary of St. Thomas Becket, first quarter of the 12th century, Champlevé copper, engraved, chased, enameled and gilt, Musée national du Moyen Âge, Paris, Photo by Marie-Lan Nguyen via Wikimedia Common, Artwork in the Public Domain. Reliquary of St. Thomas Becket, first quarter of the 12th century, Champlevé copper, engraved, chased, enameled and gilt, Musée national du Moyen Âge, Paris, Photo by Marie-Lan Nguyen via Wikimedia Common, Artwork in the Public Domain.

Champlevé (noun) A technique in enameling in which an artist creates hollows in a metal surface and fills it with enamel.  The artist who crafted the champlevé enamel scene on the Reliquary of St. Thomas Becket carved it into copper before … Continue reading

Make the Time: “The Goldfinch” by Donna Tartt

Carel Fabritius, The Goldfinch, 1654, oil on panel, 13.2” x 9”, Mauritshuis, The Hague, Photo by The Yorck Project: 10.000 Meisterwerke der Malerei via Wikimedia Commons, artwork in the Public Domain. Carel Fabritius, The Goldfinch, 1654, oil on panel, 13.2” x 9”, Mauritshuis, The Hague, Photo by The Yorck Project: 10.000 Meisterwerke der Malerei via Wikimedia Commons, artwork in the Public Domain.

Art lovers should read Donna Tartt’s novel The Goldfinch, named for a 17th–century painting featured in the book, not to learn more about the work of art’s historical significance and the circumstances of its production, but rather its quasi-mystical and … Continue reading

Stonehenge: To Err is Human

Stonehenge, c. 2100 BCE, largest stone 24’ high, diameter of circle 97’, bluestone, Salisbury Plain, Wiltshire, England, Photo by Mactographer via Wikimedia Commons. Stonehenge, c. 2100 BCE, largest stone 24’ high, diameter of circle 97’, bluestone, Salisbury Plain, Wiltshire, England, Photo by Mactographer via Wikimedia Commons.

The Art Minute University: Cat Hosch, a student at Southwestern University in Georgetown, TX, wrote this post. Located in Wiltshire, UK, this structure of mammoth proportions has called to question the true purpose of the stones. Stonehenge hides over 300 … Continue reading

Happy Birthday Jackson Pollock

Jackson Pollock, Detail of Number 1, 1949, Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, Photo by rocor via Flickr, Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.0 Generic License. Jackson Pollock, Detail of Number 1, 1949, Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, Photo by rocor via Flickr, Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.0 Generic License.

Jackson Pollock Abstract Expressionist Painter Paul Jackson Pollock was born on January 28th, 1912 in Cody, Wyoming to Stella May and LeRoy Pollock, a farmer and land surveyor. In 1930, Jackson Pollock and his brother Charles moved to New York City to take … Continue reading

Shaking Things Up with David Salle

David Salle, We’ll Shake the Bag, 1980, acrylic on canvas, 48” x 72”, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Photo by Andrew Russeth via Flickr, Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike 2.0 Generic License. David Salle, We’ll Shake the Bag, 1980, acrylic on canvas, 48” x 72”, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Photo by Andrew Russeth via Flickr, Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike 2.0 Generic License.

The Art Minute University: Abby Garcia, a student at Southwestern University in Georgetown, TX, wrote this post. Inspired by the erotic stock images he stole from his time working at a New York magazine, artist David Salle uses multiple overlapping … Continue reading

On Behalf of Aunt Jemima

Betye Saar, The Liberation of Aunt Jemima, 1972, Mixed media, 20.3 X 29.8 X 6.9 cm, University Art Museum, University of California, Berkley. Photo by Erika Clugston, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic License. Betye Saar, The Liberation of Aunt Jemima, 1972, Mixed media, 20.3 X 29.8 X 6.9 cm, University Art Museum, University of California, Berkley. Photo by Erika Clugston, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic License.

The Art Minute University: Erika Clugston, a student at Southwestern University in Georgetown, TX, wrote this post. Betye Saar’s found object assemblage, The Liberation of Aunt Jemima (1972), re-appropriates derogatory imagery as a means of protest and symbol of empowerment … Continue reading

Happy Birthday Henri Fantin-Latour

Henri Fantin-Latour, Vase of Peonies, 1881, oil on canvas, Honolulu Museum of Art, Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons. Henri Fantin-Latour, Vase of Peonies, 1881, oil on canvas, Honolulu Museum of Art, Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons.

Henri Fantin-Latour French Realist Ignace Henri Jean Théodore Fantin-Latour was born in Grenoble France on January 14th, 1836.  In 1854, he moved to Paris to study at the École des Beaux-Arts, where he befriended the American expatriate James Abbott McNeill Whistler, who sold many … Continue reading

The Wrath of Athena: Laocoön and His Sons

Hegesandros, Polydoros, and Athanodoros of Rhodes, Laocoön and His Sons, Roman copy of 1st cen. CE sculpture. Marble, 6’ 7” high, Vatican Museum, Rome, Photo by Marie-Lan Nguyen via Wikimedia Commons, Artwork in the Public Domain. Hegesandros, Polydoros, and Athanodoros of Rhodes, Laocoön and His Sons, Roman copy of 1st cen. CE sculpture. Marble, 6’ 7” high, Vatican Museum, Rome, Photo by Marie-Lan Nguyen via Wikimedia Commons, Artwork in the Public Domain.

The Art Minute University:  This post was written by Meghan Rayford, a student at Southwestern University. Laocoön, who was the priest of Poseidon, was subjected to the wrath of Athena after he suggests that the Trojan horse, filled with the Greek … Continue reading

Make the Time: Jim Hodges at the Dallas Museum of Art

Jim Hodges, detail, No Betweens, 1996, silk, cotton, polyester and thread, Photo by LollyKnit via Flickr, Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.0 Generic License. Jim Hodges, detail, No Betweens, 1996, silk, cotton, polyester and thread, Photo by LollyKnit via Flickr, Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.0 Generic License.

If you can, visit the Dallas Museum of Art to see the retrospective of Jim Hodges work before the exhibition closes this Sunday, January 12th.  You will be happy you didn’t miss it.  If you can’t make it, the show … Continue reading